Improved Functional Performance in Geriatric Patients During Hospital Stay.

The aim of this work was to evaluate the time course of changes in strength and functional performance in elderly hospitalized medical patients. This was a prospective observational study in elderly medical patients of age 65 years or older at a geriatric department.Measurements were obtained on days 2 to 4, day 5 to 8, and days 9 to 13. Functional performance was measured with De Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI) test and a 30-second chair stand test (30-s CST). Muscular strength was measured with handgrip strength. Activity level was determined with accelerometry (ActivPAL).

Results in DEMMI and 30-s CST gradually improved (P < 0.05), whereas handgrip strength remained unchanged (P > 0.05). Larger functional improvements were observed in patients with “high” compared to “low” and “moderate” activity level (P < 0.05). Changes in DEMMI score correlated with changes in 30-s CST (P < 0.05); however, changes in DEMMI score and 30-s CST were more likely to occur in patients with a low versus high functional level, respectively.

Functional performance of the lower extremities in geriatric patients improves moderately over the time of a hospital stay of less than 14 days, with larger improvements in patients with high activity level. The DEMMI test and the 30-s CST seem to be complementary to each other when evaluating functional changes in a geriatric hospital population.

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bettydroche

My interest in health and fitness started at a young age. Even though I had been educated and trained as an engineer in Europe I always want to follow my passion. I have made some guest appearances on a health educational program TV in Europe and, this experience, has made me follow my passion of sharing wellness information with others.

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